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After coming from behind in the Stanley Cup Finals, the Pittsburgh Penguins marched back to take Game 7 at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit 2-1, but another hockey story began shortly thereafter. The rich and proud tradition that takes place after the conclusion of every series where the two teams form a line and begin to shake hands didn't completely occur for the Penguins captain. It's a show of sportsmanship that no other professional leagues duplicate directly following such fierce competition.

Many have bestowed upon 21 year old Crosby, the team captain, an ability to comprehend and understand the tradition and history of the sport he plays and loves. When he makes a comment about tradition or chastises opponents about the game he takes on the mantle of a veteran player from a bye gone era that's why not apologizing for not shaking the hands of several Red Wings seems hypocritical. You can visit:  the book of mormon broadway tickets

Interviews have occurred after every Stanley Cup victory and celebrations inevitably occur, so why is this the first time this has occurred and why has someone who's supposed to know better instead just casually shrug the entire incident aside? Crosby stated his understanding from the losing side as he waited after a defeat to the Red Wings the previous year, yet the Red Wings were able to shake hands and still be accessible to the media (who aren't going anywhere) in their victory the prior year.

When the Carolina Hurricanes won the Cup in 2006, Commissioner Gary Bettman could be caught telling captain Rod Brind'Amour to put the trophy down because he wasn't done talking yet. The ultimate "me" commissioner handed the trophy to a "me" player (Crosby) this season. Some may argue that tradition suggests the acknowledgement of accomplishment and shaking of hands that occurs at the end of the series takes precedent over festivities.

The NHL ritual would have been the ultimate "sell" to newly found sports fans watching hockey that they're watching something that's very unique - for two teams after competing to shake hands as soon as the series concludes. This would have been a great explanation to viewers about the tradition of hockey and explanation regarding why it would take some additional time to speak to Crosby. The oversight to shake hands from the entire Detroit team by Sydney Crosby appears to be missed by the commissioner and missed by Crosby as to what occurred and should have occurred.

After coming from behind in the Stanley Cup Finals, the Pittsburgh Penguins marched back to take Game 7 at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit 2-1, but another hockey story began shortly thereafter. The rich and proud tradition that takes place after the conclusion of every series where the two teams form a line and begin to shake hands didn't completely occur for the Penguins captain. It's a show of sportsmanship that no other professional leagues duplicate directly following such fierce competition.

Many have bestowed upon 21 year old Crosby, the team captain, an ability to comprehend and understand the tradition and history of the sport he plays and loves. When he makes a comment about tradition or chastises opponents about the game he takes on the mantle of a veteran player from a bye gone era that's why not apologizing for not shaking the hands of several Red Wings seems hypocritical.

Interviews have occurred after every Stanley Cup victory and celebrations inevitably occur, so why is this the first time this has occurred and why has someone who's supposed to know better instead just casually shrug the entire incident aside? Crosby stated his understanding from the losing side as he waited after a defeat to the Red Wings the previous year, yet the Red Wings were able to shake hands and still be accessible to the media (who aren't going anywhere) in their victory the prior year.

When the Carolina Hurricanes won the Cup in 2006, Commissioner Gary Bettman could be caught telling captain Rod Brind'Amour to put the trophy down because he wasn't done talking yet. The ultimate "me" commissioner handed the trophy to a "me" player (Crosby) this season. Some may argue that tradition suggests the acknowledgement of accomplishment and shaking of hands that occurs at the end of the series takes precedent over festivities.

The NHL ritual would have been the ultimate "sell" to newly found sports fans watching hockey that they're watching something that's very unique - for two teams after competing to shake hands as soon as the series concludes. This would have been a great explanation to viewers about the tradition of hockey and explanation regarding why it would take some additional time to speak to Crosby. The oversight to shake hands from the entire Detroit team by Sydney Crosby appears to be missed by the commissioner and missed by Crosby as to what occurred and should have occurred. It was amaizing, see more news for wicked tickets discount here.

The Redskins were fortunate the best player available with the 13th overall pick in the draft happened to be someone that could fill a major need. The Redskins have lacked a legitimate edge pass rusher for years. They filled the void at defensive end through the years by substituting linebackers coming off the edge, but haven't had a true presence at the position since Fred Stokes, Charles Mann, and Dexter Manley.

The addition of Brian Orakpo (DE) should finally provide the Redskins with the help they've been looking for along the defensive line. Orakpo's athleticism along the line and ability to get to the quarterback in pressure situations when his team needs it the most will be welcomed, so why have him also learn how to play the "sam" linebacker position?

The Redskins have successfully duplicated failed strategies (their own, as well as others) time and time again. Last season the Redskins touted 3rd Round Draft Pick Chad Rinehart (OL) as an athletic, intelligent, and versatile lineman that could become a starter. They soon shuffled him from one position to another (OG & OT) and by the end of training camp soon realized that by throwing two different positions at him so soon he mastered neither.

If indeed Orakpo's destiny resides in becoming the edge pass rusher that can put constant pressure on the quarterback and make the big play at the end of the game when needed, then why jeopardize the future to solidify a weakness at linebacker due to a management decision? It's a simple decision. Allow Orakpo to fill out his physique as he matures and allow him to completely understand the role as he begins to dominate at the defensive end position before layering additional responsibilities, techniques, and defensive schemes from other positions onto his plate.

Placing Orakpo in the best possible position to succeed helps him and the team in the long term rather than minimize the weakness created by releasing Marcus Washington without first having his replacement on the roster. His speed and size may have the Skins thinking that he can improve the linebacking play, but if he's "The Guy" destined to play the edge in the mode of Mann and Manley then much like these two predecessors he should be given the opportunity to play at this position. The Redskins should work to solidify the linebacking play elsewhere. More things about seo company miami fl

The writing was on the wall the past two seasons at Redskins Park for Jon Jansen. Battling back from injuries and more notably a dislocated ankle, Jansen looked to survive the competition to reclaim his role as the starting right tackle. Anyone that witnessed Jansen for interviews in the local media such as Comcast Sports before the draft saw him looking svelte at 295 lbs. He proclaimed himself healthy after such a serious injury and in the best shape in years, but somewhere along the way the first player in Dan Snyder's rebuild from the Gibbs version 1.0 era fell out of favor.

The alternatives now rest with Stephon Heyer who couldn't wrestle the starting position away from Jansen and suffered through an injury plagued 2009 season. Derrick Dockery's friend, Mike Williams hasn't played in the NFL since 2005 and has reportedly dropped down to a slimming sub 390 lbs. The other candidate vying for the starting tackle position is 29 year old Jeremy Bridges.

Interesting that nowhere was it mentioned that any of the remaining offensive tackles could run block as effectively as Jansen. Nor was it reported that anyone's pass blocking skills were superior enough to play on the same line as Chris Samuels. Usually when a player is cut there's a younger better player waiting for an opportunity to play, but not in this instance.

For two years the Redskins have thought about parting ways with Jansen, but failed to adequately supply a capable replacement. This shouldn't really shock true Redskins fans. After Dockery left for the Bills in free agency, the Redskins signed Kendell to replace him for what should have only been a year. The Redskins didn't find an alternative better then Kendell then or any year after and now resigned Dockery.

Now the Redskins are duplicating a Washington Nationals strategy two years removed. The Nationals brought in an abundance of pitchers for spring training looking to find starting pitching. Now the Skins look like the spitting image of a sad strategy.

For a team looking to improve and play football in January, not having a playoff caliber offensive tackle seems like a recipe for disaster. The Bengals released often injured and former 1st round draft pick Levi Jones OT. If the Redskins consider RT important then why not give a player looking for a change in scenery hoping to stay healthy a true second chance. He may be the best option at RT on the team.

It will be interesting to see wayback machine facebook what direction the Redskins go after the 2009 season concludes. During the Bobby Beathard & Joe Gibbs era the Redskins drafted or signed undrafted free agents like Jacoby, Grimm, May, Schlereth, Simmons, McKenzie and traded or signed as a free agent such payers as Lachey, Bostic, and Thielemann. Other then drafting Samuels & Jansen the Redskins have neglected much of what legacy and recipe for success the franchise built.

There's a good formula for success. Most teams consider it flattering, but the best teams continue to win with the formula. It doesn't take long to look at the Giants and see when they keep both sides of their lines full of talent they go deep into the playoffs.

The Redskins have taken a different path choosing outside and skill players over winning the battle in the trenches. The end of the 2009 draft for the Skins went quietly into the night as the team drafted a full back, tight end, and another receiver.

Some might argue that at the end of the draft who really cares who's taken, but it demonstrates exactly how far off the page the Redskins could be from the rest of the league. Why even draft a tight end after drafting Davis last year with Cooley in front of him? Why draft another receiver with five other ones already on the depth chart? Why draft a full back when the team already has a pro bowl player that's not even a top four option on every down? Few would care if a punter or kicker was taken late since both are areas of need, but why take the other three players? At least taking a duel role player such as a long snapper would make more sense and show signs of looking into the future as Ethan Albright is closing in on 40 years of age.

Hopefully the Redskins learn from the Jansen situation and find a true replacement to ensure quality at a position as well as avoid a media circus regarding personnel decision with a lack of strategy.

At 7:00 PM tonight, the puck hits the ice in the Igloo for Game 3 of the Capitals-Penguins series. But what can we expect tonight that could possibly top Game 2?
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How about a Crosby-Malkin line?

As of today, the NHL could not have scripted the 2009 Stanley Cup playoffs any better if, you know, all those conspiracies floating around the Interwebs were actually true.

Even the players concur. "It was amazing. Two of the star-power players in the league and each getting hat tricks in the same game - you couldn't have scripted it better," Capitals forward Chris Clark told reporters after the game Monday.

Turns out truth is often stranger (or at least more jump-on-the-couch/shake the arena exciting) than fiction. Especially with the Capitals and Penguins, who have already created two instant classics.

Malkin and Crosby on the same line could come close to matching the intensity of Monday’s hat trick fest, at least if that “two-headed monster” can live up to the hype. Malkin would move to wing and Crosby would center the line if Pittsburgh Coach Dan Bylsma sends out the pair that is its own whatifsports.com dream package.

While nothing is confirmed, Bylsma hinted to NHL.com that playing the Pens top forwards on the same line was a possibility, adding, “It’s something I do in different games and different situations.”

Tossing a slumping Malkin out with Crosby, who leads NHL skaters with 8 playoff goals, could be the spark of energy the Penguins need to climb out of their 0-2 hole going into tonight’s tilt. The possibility is certainly worthy of note by the Caps.


Sid vs. Ovi

The obvious story line thus far has been the Crosby vs. Ovechkin showdown that has the two MVP’s facing off in the postseason for the first time to prove who really is King of Hockey.

From the moment the matchup became a reality last Tuesday night after the Rangers and Devils were both eliminated with Game 7 losses, there have been countless prognosticators surmising who would wind up on top and why.

As I watched Carolina score goals 3 and 4 to bury Marty and the Devils post Caps victory at the Verizon Center, the sea of red in D.C. erupted in chants of “Crosby Sucks” and buzzed with conversation about how the Capitals would defeat Sid and the rest of the Pens. The deluge of blogs, columns, stat comparisons and embedded polls have continued to burst forth.

Much like how the Bachelor tries to out-do the last emotionally twisted season with each new series, Game 2 more than upped the ante of Crosby and Ovechkin both putting up tallies in Game 1, which was certainly noteworthy enough on its own.

Dueling hat tricks from Sid the Kid and Ovi in the Stanley Cup Semi-Finals? I’m not sure how exactly to quantify the anti-uppage; a thousand-fold? Maybe a googleplex-fold?

In addition to Alexander the Great getting his first playoff hat trick, it was the first time in 13 years players from both teams had hat tricks and it was the first time ever back-to-back MVP’s were the scorers.

The third man in the equation, Evgeni Malkin, has yet to light the lamp this series despite stealing the scoring title from Ovechkin in the regular season.

Ovechkin seems to have turned the tables and knocked Malkin off his game. Despite the so-called rivalry supposedly dissipated, it certainly seems as if Ovi has a bit of a proverbial bulls-eye on Malkin’s back every time they share the ice and he has leveled some hits on Geno that were hard to ignore.

All of the elements leading up to tonight create the opportunity for a perfect storm leading to a breakout night from Malkin. Or, should I say, Hurricane Geno.